Experience Peace and Tranquility in Anguib Beach, Sta. Ana, Cagayan

by • February 14, 2014 • Destinations, ReviewsComments (0)6886

Day Dreaming @ Anguib Beach by Bryan Rapadas

Day Dreaming @ Anguib Beach : Photo by Bryan Rapadas

Sta. Ana, Cagayan rests on the edge of Northeastern Luzon and is blessed with bountiful natural attractions. And one of these attractions is Anguib Beach, which is considered as the “Boracay of the North.” Anguib Beach has powdery white sands and pristine blue waters too but what sets it apart from Boracay is that the crowd is minimal. While Boracay is a tourist haven, Anguib Beach is peaceful which makes it the ideal destination for those who just want to relax, reflect and laze around.

Anguib Beach, Sta. Ana, Cagayan photo by Mich Nava

Anguib Beach, Sta. Ana, Cagayan photo by Mich Nava

Reasons to visit Anguib Beach

You may have a lot on your mind when you visit this place but most visitors come here for relaxation. Basically, all the enjoyable activities you get to do on the beach such as going for a swim, walking around the place, and taking lots of photographs are in the mix. A bit of immersion can also enrich your experience more by talking to the locals and eating their local recipes.

Those who are into camping will love the idea of pitching a tent on the shores. It’s a place that promotes conversations to be had amongst friends.

Although Anguib Beach is reachable by boat from San Vicente port in Sta. Ana, it was once reachable by land by trekking through the hills. However, that area is now privately owned so no one is allowed to pass through.

It is also being developed by the Cagayan Export Zone Authority and one of the developments is a road that connects the beach to Sta. Ana. In fact, residents used to call the beach an “island” because it was reachable by boat only.

Getting to Anguib Beach

By land from Manila

  • Take a Florida bus in Sampaloc Terminal bound for Sta. Ana, Cagayan, Take not that the travel will be a very long one: 15 hours.
  • From the town center of Sta. Ana, take a tricycle to San Vicente port and hire a boat to get you to Anguib Beach. Travel time is 30 minutes.

By land from Manila (alternate route)

  • Take a bus bound for Tuguegarao. The trip will take around 10-12 hours.
  • Once you arrive at Tuguegarao, board a bus headed for Sta. Ana. The estimated travel time for this trip Is 3-4 hours.

By air from Manila

  • Take a plane headed for Tuguegarao. The flight will take an hour.
  • After arriving at Tuguegarao, board a bus headed for Sta. Ana. The trip will take around 3-4 hours.
Anguib Beach by Katherine Nell Ng

Anguib Beach by Katherine Nell Ng

Tips for Enjoying Anguib Beach

  • You can rent a cottage, but it’s just for convenience. The cottage has chairs and a table, and that’s it.
  • Visit during the summer months (March to June) so you really get to enjoy what the beach has to offer. Plus, the summer months will bring more shine than rain, which is really good for sea travel.
  • Bring a tent, food, and other supplies if you choose to stay overnight.
  • Take a lot of pictures. Walk around the entire length of the beach to get different views to show the folks back at home.
  • Hire a boat for island hopping. There are a few boats around the beach you can hire to take you on a tour around the beach.
  • Don’t try to start a bonfire party. Lighting a fire isn’t allowed for eco-tourism purposes because the fire will damage the white, powdery sand.

General tip: try to begin your journey as early as possible, especially if the weekend is all the free time you have and you plan on taking a land trip. It’s more cost-effective that way, but it takes longer to get to your destination.

Although Anguib Beach isn’t equipped with modern comforts, you will surely delight in the time you get to spend in peace accompanied by the sound of waves. By the time you head back home, you’re more than ready to face everyday activities again.

 

bryan_rapadas_anguib_beach2 mich_nava_anguib_beach katherinenell_anguib_beach_birds Anguib Beach, Cagayan


 
** A big thank you to Mich Nava, Katherine Nell Ng and Bryan Rapadas for the photos above and Alexander Almazan for the video.

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